There are currently 24 states with e-waste laws plus New York City. We will be going through each individually over the coming months. Today, we’ll start with California, the first state to pass a comprehensive electronic waste law back in 2003.

The first legislation in 2003 was to begin funding a system for the collection and recycling of some e-wastes. This was done through the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle for short) and through the state’s Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). The legislation, called the Electronic Waste Recycling Act of 2003, requires a recycling fee be assessed as a tax on retailers ñ who usually pass it on to consumers. This began in 2005. The fees are based on the dimensions of the product’s screen size, measured diagonally. The fees were last updated in 2009:

Continue Reading

Currently in the United States, there is no federal law mandating e-waste disposal, though there are some Environmental Protection Agency regulations that cover some types of electronic waste (specifically the mercury found in some electronics and requirements for cathode ray tubes).

Outside of federal regulation, however, there are 20 states and one city that have passed e-waste laws in the past decade. Each has specific requirements for those in their jurisdictions. These states, and the year their law was initially passed (or went into effect), include:

Continue Reading

Often, health care businesses are a little daunted by the task of disposing of e-waste properly. Beyond the standard environmental laws that govern how electronics may be disposed of, medical offices also have to consider strict guidelines for specific medical wastes as well as medical records (HIPAA) security. It can get complicated.

The United States Department of Health and Human Services says that a large percentage of health data security breaches are due to improper disposal of electronic equipment from hospitals and clinics. In one case, an entire truck full of hard drives from discarded computers disappeared while on its way to a disposal facility, compromising an estimated 50,000 patient records. In another case, a person impersonating an e-waste disposal worker gained access to tens of thousands of patient records and files as well as thousands of dollars in computer equipment.

Both of these were preventable and happened because security measures were not in place to prevent breaches and to minimize data loss should a breach happen.

Every medical office should have three things in place:

Continue Reading

FAIR LAWN, NJ – (August 2, 2011) – Samsung Business Partners now have a complete e-waste solution thanks to a new partnership between Samsung and AnythingIT, a world leader in asset recovery and e-waste disposal. This gives a cutting-edge, cost-effective solution for electronics disposal for all Samsung partners.
This alliance was renewed after more than ten years of collaboration between the two companies. “We’re very pleased to continue working with Samsung,” says AnythingIT President David Bernstein. “Through this partnership, we are able to offer one of the most comprehensive programs for e-waste disposal and asset recovery in the industry. Samsung Business Partners will continue to enjoy one of the industry’s most complete programs.”

Continue Reading